/page/2
postgraphics:

Himalayan death tolls
Since 1950, around 25,000 summit climbs have been attempted on peaks in the Himalayas with more than 600 people dying in the attempt. More people have died on Everest than on any other Himalayan mountain but it is not the most deadly peak in the range. Lesser-known Nepalese mountains all have a higher historical ratio of summit attempts to climbers not making it home.
Read related article

postgraphics:

Himalayan death tolls

Since 1950, around 25,000 summit climbs have been attempted on peaks in the Himalayas with more than 600 people dying in the attempt. More people have died on Everest than on any other Himalayan mountain but it is not the most deadly peak in the range. Lesser-known Nepalese mountains all have a higher historical ratio of summit attempts to climbers not making it home.

Read related article

Many highly creative people [display] personal behavior [that] sometimes strikes others as odd. Albert Einstein picked up cigarette butts off the street to get tobacco for his pipe; Howard Hughes spent entire days on a chair in the middle of the supposedly germ-free zone of his Beverly Hills Hotel suite; the composer Robert Schumann believed that his musical compositions were dictated to him by Beethoven and other deceased luminaries from their tombs; and Charles Dickens is said to have fended off imaginary urchins with his umbrella as he walked the streets of London.

[…]

In fact, creativity and eccentricity often go hand in hand, and researchers now believe that both traits may be a result of how the brain filters incoming information. Even in the business world, there is a growing appreciation of the link between creative thinking and unconventional behavior, with increased acceptance of the latter. …

In the past few decades psychologists and other scientists have explored the connection using empirically validated measures of both creativity and eccentricity. [The latter is measured] using scales that assess schizotypal personality … which is among a cluster of personality disorders labeled ‘odd or eccentric’ in the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

[…]

A brain-imaging study, done in 2010 by investigators at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, suggests the propensity for both creative insights and schizotypal experiences may result from a specific configuration of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain. Using positron-emission tomography, Örjan de Manzano, Fredrik Ullén and their colleagues examined the density of dopamine D2 receptors in the subcortical region of the thalamus in 14 subjects who were tested for divergent-thinking skills. The results indicate that thalamic D2 receptor densities are diminished in subjects with high divergent-thinking abilities, similar to patterns found in schizophrenic subjects in previous studies. The researchers believe that reduced dopamine binding in the thalamus, found in both creative and schizophrenic subjects, may decrease cognitive filtering and allow more information into conscious awareness.

– Fascinating Scientific American article on why creative people tend to be eccentric. For real-life case studies, look no further than the odd habits and eccentric behaviors of famous writers. (via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

The Science Of Great Ideas--How to Train Your Creative Brain

drewvigal:

Since ideas are made from finding relationships between existing elements, we need to collect a mental inventory of these elements before we can start connecting them. Preparing your brain for the process of making new connections takes time and effort. We need to get into the habit of collecting information that’s all around us so our brains have something to work with.

One of the reasons why I’ve been collecting inspirational projects and categorize them in separate Tumblr blogs:

  • Commonplace Pages: For the main collection, insights and occasional personal post.
  • Dream Lectures: If ever i’m back in the classroom, I would fill some of my instructional time with guest dream lectures from the web.
  • Interactive Narratives: If I were to create a broadcast channel to distribute interactive, visual and journalistic storytelling, this blog would be its programming. This blog has temporarily replaced InteractiveNarratives.org.
  • My Own MTV: Some will remember when MTV stood for Music Television. Yes, a channel that actually played music videos. So, here’s a collection of music videos, short fiction films and/or some great eye candy. This Tumblr blog was created mainly for inspirational projects that were visually stunning but somehow lacked depth or meaningful interaction.
  • Xyrillan: The technology to simulate any environment. My current favorite as there are tons of inspirational goodness in this Tumblr blog. (Extra points: why did I name it Xyrillan?)

Enjoy.

Although the experience of insight is sudden and can seem disconnected from the immediately preceding thought, these studies show that insight is the culmination of a series of brain states and processes operating at different time scales.

Reminds me of a recent quote I read from Russell Simmons on meditating: “Every creative idea, every second of happiness, is from stillness…”

wendymacnaughton:

On Resolve and New Year’s Resolution, accompanying a piece by Caroline Paul here.

wendymacnaughton:

On Resolve and New Year’s Resolution, accompanying a piece by Caroline Paul here.

(via ilovecharts)

postgraphics:

Himalayan death tolls
Since 1950, around 25,000 summit climbs have been attempted on peaks in the Himalayas with more than 600 people dying in the attempt. More people have died on Everest than on any other Himalayan mountain but it is not the most deadly peak in the range. Lesser-known Nepalese mountains all have a higher historical ratio of summit attempts to climbers not making it home.
Read related article

postgraphics:

Himalayan death tolls

Since 1950, around 25,000 summit climbs have been attempted on peaks in the Himalayas with more than 600 people dying in the attempt. More people have died on Everest than on any other Himalayan mountain but it is not the most deadly peak in the range. Lesser-known Nepalese mountains all have a higher historical ratio of summit attempts to climbers not making it home.

Read related article

typeverything:

Typeverything.com
Rise Above by Patrick Cabral.
via From up North.

typeverything:

Typeverything.com

Rise Above by Patrick Cabral.

via From up North.

Many highly creative people [display] personal behavior [that] sometimes strikes others as odd. Albert Einstein picked up cigarette butts off the street to get tobacco for his pipe; Howard Hughes spent entire days on a chair in the middle of the supposedly germ-free zone of his Beverly Hills Hotel suite; the composer Robert Schumann believed that his musical compositions were dictated to him by Beethoven and other deceased luminaries from their tombs; and Charles Dickens is said to have fended off imaginary urchins with his umbrella as he walked the streets of London.

[…]

In fact, creativity and eccentricity often go hand in hand, and researchers now believe that both traits may be a result of how the brain filters incoming information. Even in the business world, there is a growing appreciation of the link between creative thinking and unconventional behavior, with increased acceptance of the latter. …

In the past few decades psychologists and other scientists have explored the connection using empirically validated measures of both creativity and eccentricity. [The latter is measured] using scales that assess schizotypal personality … which is among a cluster of personality disorders labeled ‘odd or eccentric’ in the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

[…]

A brain-imaging study, done in 2010 by investigators at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, suggests the propensity for both creative insights and schizotypal experiences may result from a specific configuration of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain. Using positron-emission tomography, Örjan de Manzano, Fredrik Ullén and their colleagues examined the density of dopamine D2 receptors in the subcortical region of the thalamus in 14 subjects who were tested for divergent-thinking skills. The results indicate that thalamic D2 receptor densities are diminished in subjects with high divergent-thinking abilities, similar to patterns found in schizophrenic subjects in previous studies. The researchers believe that reduced dopamine binding in the thalamus, found in both creative and schizophrenic subjects, may decrease cognitive filtering and allow more information into conscious awareness.

– Fascinating Scientific American article on why creative people tend to be eccentric. For real-life case studies, look no further than the odd habits and eccentric behaviors of famous writers. (via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

The Science Of Great Ideas--How to Train Your Creative Brain

drewvigal:

Since ideas are made from finding relationships between existing elements, we need to collect a mental inventory of these elements before we can start connecting them. Preparing your brain for the process of making new connections takes time and effort. We need to get into the habit of collecting information that’s all around us so our brains have something to work with.

One of the reasons why I’ve been collecting inspirational projects and categorize them in separate Tumblr blogs:

  • Commonplace Pages: For the main collection, insights and occasional personal post.
  • Dream Lectures: If ever i’m back in the classroom, I would fill some of my instructional time with guest dream lectures from the web.
  • Interactive Narratives: If I were to create a broadcast channel to distribute interactive, visual and journalistic storytelling, this blog would be its programming. This blog has temporarily replaced InteractiveNarratives.org.
  • My Own MTV: Some will remember when MTV stood for Music Television. Yes, a channel that actually played music videos. So, here’s a collection of music videos, short fiction films and/or some great eye candy. This Tumblr blog was created mainly for inspirational projects that were visually stunning but somehow lacked depth or meaningful interaction.
  • Xyrillan: The technology to simulate any environment. My current favorite as there are tons of inspirational goodness in this Tumblr blog. (Extra points: why did I name it Xyrillan?)

Enjoy.

Although the experience of insight is sudden and can seem disconnected from the immediately preceding thought, these studies show that insight is the culmination of a series of brain states and processes operating at different time scales.

Reminds me of a recent quote I read from Russell Simmons on meditating: “Every creative idea, every second of happiness, is from stillness…”

wendymacnaughton:

On Resolve and New Year’s Resolution, accompanying a piece by Caroline Paul here.

wendymacnaughton:

On Resolve and New Year’s Resolution, accompanying a piece by Caroline Paul here.

(via ilovecharts)

(Source: traceloops, via petervidani)

"

Many highly creative people [display] personal behavior [that] sometimes strikes others as odd. Albert Einstein picked up cigarette butts off the street to get tobacco for his pipe; Howard Hughes spent entire days on a chair in the middle of the supposedly germ-free zone of his Beverly Hills Hotel suite; the composer Robert Schumann believed that his musical compositions were dictated to him by Beethoven and other deceased luminaries from their tombs; and Charles Dickens is said to have fended off imaginary urchins with his umbrella as he walked the streets of London.

[…]

In fact, creativity and eccentricity often go hand in hand, and researchers now believe that both traits may be a result of how the brain filters incoming information. Even in the business world, there is a growing appreciation of the link between creative thinking and unconventional behavior, with increased acceptance of the latter. …

In the past few decades psychologists and other scientists have explored the connection using empirically validated measures of both creativity and eccentricity. [The latter is measured] using scales that assess schizotypal personality … which is among a cluster of personality disorders labeled ‘odd or eccentric’ in the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

[…]

A brain-imaging study, done in 2010 by investigators at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, suggests the propensity for both creative insights and schizotypal experiences may result from a specific configuration of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain. Using positron-emission tomography, Örjan de Manzano, Fredrik Ullén and their colleagues examined the density of dopamine D2 receptors in the subcortical region of the thalamus in 14 subjects who were tested for divergent-thinking skills. The results indicate that thalamic D2 receptor densities are diminished in subjects with high divergent-thinking abilities, similar to patterns found in schizophrenic subjects in previous studies. The researchers believe that reduced dopamine binding in the thalamus, found in both creative and schizophrenic subjects, may decrease cognitive filtering and allow more information into conscious awareness.

"

About:

Following: